Coming Soon

Oh god, Bones is doing a two-part season opener set in the UK, aka the famous bits of London. This is not something US TV is noted for doing well, and Bones is not blessed with what we like to call “subtlety”. I’m expecting this to be full of Scotland Yard officers wearing tweed and bowler hats. (I wasn’t sure what to make of the previous season finale either, which featured a major twist in which one regular cast member acted completely out of character for the sake of the plot.)

Torchwood Season 3 will be a five part miniseries, and it’ll air on BBC One, stripped across one week at 9 p.m. in the same vein as the disappointing BBC1 drama Criminal Justice. BBC1, eh? The continued success of Torchwood is as meteoric as it is inexplicable.

Ronald D. Moore has another pilot TV Movie on the go, Virtuality, which sounds a) exactly like a holodeck-goes-wrong episode of The Next Generation and b) completely uninteresting. Virtual reality almost never makes for good TV because it has no consequences, meaning that consequences have to be unconvincingly slapped on: “If you die in the game you die out here too” / “If you unplug her she’ll die”.

I do seem to remember having a sneaking fondness for the short-lived VR.5, but that’s probably because it had Anthony Head and David McCallum in it. (Alternatively it may be because it’s “without doubt the best, most entertaining and thought provoking and compelling sci fi TV series I have ever seen, or can ever envisage being made” as someone on IMDB hilariously claims.)

I’m enjoying HBO’s seven-part Generation Kill miniseries at the moment. It took a little while to get to grips with the characters, and I’m still not entirely sure I know who everyone is, but over the first few episodes the series has deepened and become more absorbing. It’s esentially a cross between Band of Brothers and Jarhead, but based on a real journalistic account of the early days of the Iraq war. The production values are impressive, and the series looks for all the world like it was shot in Iraq during the invasion. It has the same sense of verité that David Simon and Ed Burns brought to The Wire, and a lot of clear parallels in showing flawed people at the mercy of petty and incompetent leaders. What’s remarkable is the sense of complete aimlessless and confusion in what should be a co-ordinated military campaign.

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